Blog

  • Wondering What's Next for the News

    August 28, 2009

    This is the fifth and final blog post in a series of guest posts on the future of news by former staff of the Rocky Mountain News, marking the six-month anniversary since the 150-year-old paper published its final edition.

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    When I was a student at the University of Denver, Chancellor Maurice Mitchell shared with me his theory of the evolution of media. He believed that the more intimate medium would inevitably supplant the less. Thus, the extremely portable 35 mm camera led to large format magazines like Life and Look, which replaced the text-based magazines like Colliers. Television, in turn, ruined the large format mags. That conversation took place more than 40 years ago, but I'm convinced Mitchell was right. It took a while, but 24-hour cable news and the internet have taken their toll on newspapers.

  • FCC Probe Puts Carriers in the Crosshairs

    August 28, 2009

    The Federal Communications Commission has turned up the heat on the wireless industry expanding its probe of mobile phone practices following widespread complaints about a lack of competition, openness and innovation.

  • FCC Probe Puts Carriers in the Crosshairs

    August 28, 2009

    The Federal Communications Commission has turned up the heat on the wireless industry expanding its probe of mobile phone practices following widespread complaints about a lack of competition, openness and innovation.

  • Photojournalism Six Months Later

    August 27, 2009

    This is the fourth in a series of guest blog posts on the future of news by former staff of the Rocky Mountain News, marking the six-month anniversary since the 150-year-old paper published its final edition. Join us this Thursday at 5 p.m. ET/ 3 p.m. MT to chat live with these writers.

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    Well, six months after the close of the Rocky, I'm still running around with a camera (sometimes a still one, sometimes video) trying to make what is in front of me into a story.

    I freelanced quite a bit before joining the paper, so (for better and worse) it hasn't been a shocking change. Although one noticeable difference is the different pace at which the "outside world" operates. What happened in minutes or hours at the newspaper happens in hours or days now. I don't think that's a bad thing, but it has been an adjustment.

    I've been involved with a few projects and ventures since the closure. Some have worked out better than others, and others are yet to be determined. One exciting project is a Web site that Lesley Kennedy, the Rocky's deputy features editor, and I launched in June.

  • New Models, New Challenges

    August 26, 2009

    This is the third in a series of guest blog posts on the future of news by former staff of the Rocky Mountain News, marking the six-month anniversary since the 150-year-old paper published its final edition. Join us this Thursday at 5 p.m. ET/ 3 p.m. MT to chat live with these writers.

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    One of the questions we at the Rocky Mountain Independent hear a lot is, “Did you guys think about operating as a nonprofit?” After all, similar online news ventures in Minneapolis and San Diego seem to be doing well with that model. Why not Denver?

  • FCC Chief Stands with Public Interest in Support of Net Neutrality

    August 26, 2009

    The Federal Communications Commission will stand with the public interest to prevent Internet providers from blocking, slowing or in any way degrading lawful content on the Web.

  • A Golden Age for Community News?

    August 25, 2009

    This is the second in a series of guest blog posts on the future of news by former staff of the Rocky Mountain News, marking the six-month anniversary since the 150-year-old paper published its final edition. Join us this Thursday at 5 p.m. ET/ 3 p.m. MT to chat live with these writers.

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    Six months ago this week, the unthinkable happened.

    I got my picture in the paper. And for a reporter, that’s never a good thing.

    We’re never supposed to be part of the story, but there we were inside the Rocky Mountain News newsroom, just another batch of “victims” of the economic downturn and what some people were calling a wholesale collapse of the newspaper industry.

  • Learning Lessons from the Rocky Mountain News

    August 24, 2009

    This is the first in a series of guest blog posts on the future of news by former staff of the Rocky Mountain News, marking the six-month anniversary since the 150-year-old paper published its final edition. Join us this Thursday at 5 p.m. ET/ 3 p.m. MT to chat live with these writers.

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    As reporters go, Tony was the type to make interns’ palms sweat.

    He asked hard questions of his sources on the city beat, cranked out copy like a machine, and had a look that told a rookie reporter, “There is such thing as a dumb question, and you’re about to ask one.” Generous in stature and prone to raising his voice, he loomed large in the newsroom. As an intern, I knew Tony was the one to watch. Not that I could help it: I had the dubious honor of sharing the desk right next to his.

  • Cracks in the Pay Walls

    August 24, 2009

    Over the weekend, Tim Rutten of the Los Angeles Times published a column urging Congress “to move quickly to grant the newspaper industry at least a temporary exemption from antitrust and price-fixing laws so that publishers and proprietors can, in essence, collude for survival.”

    Rutten is half-right. There is indeed a legitimate and an increasingly pressing need for government to intervene in the journalism crisis. But the policies Rutten prescribes would actually undermine the goals he professes to champion. Suspending antitrust protections to allow digital collusion, whereby newspapers erect online price-fixing schemes and place their content behind “pay walls,” is exactly the wrong policy to encourage democratic discourse.

  • AT&T's About Face

    August 22, 2009

    AT&T has just done another about face. Earlier the phone giant said that it "does not manage or approve applications" for the App Store.

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People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good