The FCC and Media Policy

The Federal Communications Commission is charged with overseeing and regulating our nation’s communications infrastructure. Though the FCC is supposed to serve the public interest, too often it favors corporate wish lists, particularly when it comes to reviewing mergers and writing Internet policy. Free Press amplifies the public’s voice through outreaches, blog posts, events, and official filings and pushes the FCC to listen to the people it’s supposed to represent.

Blog Posts

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Press Releases

  • Free Press Joins Defense of Net Neutrality Alongside Other Open Internet Advocates, Tech and Telecom Companies

    May 22, 2015
    WASHINGTON — Free Press on Friday joined nearly two dozen advocacy groups and tech industry leaders to intervene in defense of the Federal Communications Commission's Net Neutrality order. The groups filed in opposition to the entrenched cable, telephone and wireless lobbying associations' motion for a stay of the FCC’s landmark Feb. 26 decision.
  • Open Internet Groups Launch the ‘Internet Health Test’

    May 19, 2015
    WASHINGTON — On Tuesday, BattlefortheNet.com launched the "Internet Health Test" to collect data on Internet speeds across the Web. The test is an interactive tool that lets users run speed measurements across multiple interconnection points and collect data on whether and where Internet service providers are degrading online speeds and violating Net Neutrality.
  • Free Press Intervenes to Defend Net Neutrality Rules in Court

    May 13, 2015
    WASHINGTON -- Free Press on Wednesday filed to intervene in the industry-backed court case challenging the FCC’s Net Neutrality rules. The motion to intervene filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit states Free Press' intention to defend the FCC’s landmark Feb. 26 vote to reclassify broadband as a Title II service under the Communications Act.
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Resources

  • Intervenors' Opposition to Motion for Stay of the Net Neutrality Order

    Free Press joined nearly two dozen advocacy groups and tech industry leaders to intervene in defense of the Federal Communications Commission's Net Neutrality order. The groups filed in opposition to the entrenched cable, telephone and wireless lobbying associations' motion for a stay of the FCC's landmark Feb. 26 decision.
     

    May 22, 2015
  • Free Press Motion to Intervene in Support of the FCC's Net Neutrality Rules

    Free Press filed this motion to defend the Net Neutrality rules the FCC adopted on Feb. 26, 2015.

    May 13, 2015
  • Reclassification Is Not a Dirty Word

    On Feb. 26, 2015, the FCC voted to reclassify broadband access service under Title II of the Communications Act — marking the biggest win for the public interest in the agency’s history. Reclassification will protect free expression online — and resolve years of bad policy decisions that have threatened the Internet’s underlying architecture.
    March 26, 2015
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News from Around the Web

  • How the Battle for the Future of the Web Is Shaped by Economics

    Washington Post
    May 19, 2015

    There are two stories people are trying to tell right now about the future of the Internet.

    One is that we need some basic rules to make sure the Web remains open and free so that companies that depend on the Internet can grow. The other is that strict rules will discourage Internet providers from making the investments that will enhance the network for everybody.

  • The AOL-Verizon Merger and Net Neutrality

    Center for Responsive Politics
    May 13, 2015

    In the run-up to the FCC decision on Net Neutrality earlier this year, Verizon flexed its lobbying muscle in opposition to rules that would regulate the Internet as a public utility. The company has few peers when it comes to lobbying in the capital, but a network of smaller companies and interests backed the regs publicly and behind the scenes — including AOL. This week, though, Verizon agreed to acquire AOL in a deal reportedly worth $4.4 billion.

  • Rand Paul Leads Charge to Kill Net Neutrality

    National Journal
    April 30, 2015

    Sen. Rand Paul introduced a bill Wednesday to repeal the Federal Communications Commission's Net Neutrality regulations.

    The move will do little to endear Paul to Silicon Valley executives, who largely support the new rules, as he tries to raise money from them for his bid for the Republican presidential nomination. And it cuts against his image as the candidate most in touch with young and tech-savvy voters.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good