AT&T: More Barriers. In More Devices.

AT&T is caving. Sort of.

When the iPhone 5 launched last year, Apple announced that FaceTime, its video calling application, would now work over mobile networks.

This was great news, especially for people who depend on video calling to communicate. But then AT&T blocked its customers from using FaceTime over its network.

Thanks to enormous public pressure — including our threat to file a complaint at the Federal Communications Commission — AT&T is starting to relent. It’s allowing more customers to use FaceTime over its network. But more isn’t good enough.

AT&T is still blocking FaceTime for all customers with unlimited data plans. That’s a lot of people.

Let’s be clear: Data is data. AT&T has no right to decide how its customers use it.

We’re gaining traction in this fight — and now we need your help to finish the job. We built a page to show AT&T what the public really thinks about it. Click here to add your comment. The more we make a stink, the more likely it is that we — the public — will win.

This FaceTime fight is only the latest AT&T attack on our right to communicate online. And it’s about to get worse.

In the coming months, AT&T will launch a full-scale effort to remove any local or national rules that require it to maintain an open, accessible network. We need to tell AT&T to stop trying to take away our freedom to connect. That's why this FaceTime issue is so important.

Click here and tell AT&T what you think about its Net Neutrality violation.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good